Archive for February, 2023

The Jobs-To-Be-Done Theory and ChatGPT: How AI Can Serve Stakeholders in Higher Education

credit: Midjourney. Campus and technology

The advent of ChatGPT provides opportunities to examine how to frame the adoption and utilities of these new technologies consistent with the mission and values of an organization. One question to consider is the following:

How does ChatGPT contribute to the stakeholders of an organization and their intended “jobs” or “purpose”? 

Clayton Christensen’s “Jobs To Be Done” theory is a framework for understanding customer behavior and needs. It suggests that people buy products or services to do “jobs” that solve a problem or fulfill a desire. This theory applies to higher education, with Southern New Hampshire University as an example. Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU) grew from 2,500 students to more than 80,000 by applying the jobs-to-be-done theory from Clayton Christensen. SNHU understood why different students attend college and provided better services accordingly. I prompted ChatGPT to provide how the theory applies to the various groups affiliated with an institution:

  1. Job to be done for students: The primary job to be done for students is to obtain a degree or credential that will help them achieve their career goals. However, there are other jobs that students need to accomplish to be successful in their academic journey. For example, students may need to find resources to help them study effectively, get feedback on their work, or build a network of peers and mentors.
  2. Job to be done for faculty: The job to be done for faculty is to provide high-quality education to their students. However, there are other jobs that faculty need to accomplish to be successful in their role. For example, faculty may need to find ways to engage their students, develop new courses or programs, or conduct research that advances their field.
  3. Job to be done for administrators: To be done for administrators is to support the institution’s mission and ensure that it runs efficiently and effectively. However, there are other jobs that administrators need to accomplish to be successful in their roles. For example, administrators may need to find ways to recruit and retain students, manage budgets and resources, or build relationships with community partners.
  4. Job to be done for staff: The team’s primary job is to support the institution’s mission and ensure that it is running smoothly. However, there are other jobs that staff need to accomplish to be successful in their roles. For example, staff may need to provide excellent customer service to students and other stakeholders, manage budgets and resources, or maintain facilities and equipment.
  5. Job to be done for managers: The job to be done for managers is to lead and support their staff in achieving their goals. However, there are other jobs managers need to accomplish to succeed in their roles. For example, managers may need to develop and implement policies and procedures, manage budgets and resources, or build stakeholder relationships.
  6. Job to be done for support staff: The job to be done for support staff is to provide administrative support to other departments or individuals within the institution. However, there are other jobs that support staff need to accomplish to be successful in their roles. For example, support staff may need to manage schedules and appointments, maintain databases and records, or provide technical support.
  7. Job to be done for prospective students: The primary job to be done for prospective students is to find a college or university that meets their academic, career, and personal goals. However, there are other jobs that students need to accomplish to be successful in their college search. For example, students may need to navigate the application process, understand financial aid options, or learn about campus culture and student life.
  8. Job to be done for parents: The job to be done for parents is to support their child in finding a college or university that is a good fit and provides a quality education. However, there are other jobs that parents need to accomplish to be successful in this process. For example, parents may need to understand the financial implications of college attendance, research and visit potential colleges with their child, or provide emotional support and guidance throughout the process.
  9. Job to be done for alums: The primary job to be done for alums is to maintain a connection with their alma mater and to feel a sense of belonging to the institution. This can include staying informed about institutional updates and events, receiving career support and networking opportunities, and giving back to the institution through donations or volunteer work.

So, for each of the groups above and their “jobs to be done,” consider the impacts and consequences (even unintended) of adopting ChatGPT as a tool. For example, the consideration of using ChatGPT for students could be to address “time poverty.” Wladis et al. (Citation 2018) define time poverty as insufficient time to devote to college work (i.e., lack of available time to maintain academic well-being). Students’ time in physical lines to campus offices or virtual queues for their questions to be answered may prevent them from attending classes or studying. Often, marginalized students with financial needs may be the ones who are not only experience financial poverty but time poverty as well.

I recently read an article stating, “don’t automate things that you care about.” Considering the controversy around Vanderbilt University’s use of ChatGPT to write a statement about a tragedy at another school, I agree with the sentiment. However, one could frame the use of automation this way – automate transactional and repeatable processes so staff can spend more time with students who require care. This is a lesson I learned many years ago when I was reminded by an Enrollment Services administrator at my campus that admissions, financial aid, and registrar deal with highly emotional situations. I saw these situations firsthand as I observed students occasionally sobbing after visiting one of these offices. So, if students can be provided self-service via ChatGPT or other chatbots and staff’s time towards transactional and repeatable processes can be reduced to spend more time advising students in need, I think there’s a case to be made about the value of technologies such as ChatGPT.


Navigating the Cybersecurity Risks of ChatGPT in Higher Education

Introduction

As technology continues to advance, so do the risks associated with cybersecurity. Higher education institutions are particularly vulnerable to cyber threats due to the vast amount of sensitive data they store, including financial records, personal information, academic records and research data. Cyberattacks can disrupt online learning, compromise academic integrity, expose sensitive information, or damage institutional reputation. Given the potential consequences, cybersecurity is everyone’s responsibility. Consider the following statistics:- Education is the most targeted industry, with an average of 2297 cyberattacks against organizations each week in the first half of 2022; a 44% increase compared to the first half of 2021. [source]- Around 41% of higher education cyber incidents and breaches were caused by social engineering machinations². [source]- In 2021, 40% of victims in the higher education sector took longer than one month to recover from a cyberattack. [source]- The FBI’s Cyber Division recently warned that ransomware poses a considerable risk for higher education, as cybercriminals using this type of attack are now focusing heavily on colleges and universities. [source]Some possible repercussions of cybersecurity attacks in higher education are:

  • Disruption of remote learning and teaching due to malware infections or denial-of-service attacks. [source]Loss of sensitive data such as student records, research data, financial information, or intellectual property. [source]Damage to reputation and trust among students, faculty, staff, alums, donors, and partners.Legal liability and regulatory fines for non-compliance with data protection laws or contractual obligations.

Here are some recent cases of cybersecurity attacks in higher education:

  • In September 2021, Howard University suffered a ransomware attack that forced it to shut down its online classes and campus network for several days. [source]In July 2021, the University of California San Diego Health reported a data breach that exposed the personal information of half a million patients. [source] In July 2020, the University of Utah Health disclosed another data breach that affected over 10,000 patients due to an attack on its email system.[source]

One such technology that can potentially introduce cybersecurity risks in higher education is ChatGPT.ChatGPT is a large language model trained by OpenAI that can generate human-like text responses to a wide range of prompts. While ChatGPT has the potential to contribute to the core mission of student success/experience, learning & teaching, and research higher education professionals who use ChatGPT may unwittingly expose themselves to phishing attacks, social engineering scams, and information leaks.In this blog post, we will discuss the potential cybersecurity risks associated with ChatGPT in higher education and provide recommendations for protecting against them. We will also outline the steps that higher education professionals can take to secure ChatGPT in their environments, ensuring that they can safely use this technology to enhance their work without putting themselves or their institutions at risk.

What is ChatGPT?

ChatGPT, a large language model trained by OpenAI, uses machine learning algorithms to create human-like text responses to many prompts. ChatGPT analyzes massive data from books, webpages, and other text-based sources. It then builds a language model to guess and generate text based on a prompt. To improve its responses in areas like education, ChatGPT can be tuned.ChatGPT could improve teacher, staff, and student collaboration in higher education. For instance, it can augment campus capacity by providing departments with 24/7 self-service capability to provide information to students via chatbots. This student success support model highlights potential areas of student/university interactions where chatbot technology can enhance the experience. ChatGPT can help study and data analysis by generating insights and recommendations from large datasets. Additional insights on ChatGPT and higher education through web articles, presentations, and campus policies/guidance are compiled here.Some faculty members, including Ethan Mollick’s experiment with AI in the classroom, showed that AI tools like ChatGPT could enhance the learning experience with proper training and guidance.ChatGPT may help higher education, but it also poses cybersecurity risks. The language model can create convincing phishing emails or social engineering attacks to trick higher education professionals into divulging sensitive information or installing malware on their devices. If not secured, ChatGPT can leak private information. Thus, higher education professionals must understand these risks and defend themselves and their institutions.

Potential Cybersecurity Risks Introduced by ChatGPT in Higher Education

While ChatGPT has many potential benefits for higher education, it also introduces new cybersecurity risks. These risks can include the following:

  • Phishing attacks: ChatGPT can generate convincing phishing emails that appear to be from legitimate sources, such as the IT department or a trusted colleague. These emails can trick higher education professionals into revealing sensitive information or installing malware on their devices. Here’s an example:

Social engineering attacks:

ChatGPT can also be used to generate convincing messages that manipulate higher education professionals into taking specific actions, such as downloading a file or clicking on a link. Social engineering attacks can be particularly dangerous because they exploit human psychology and can be difficult to detect.

  • Information leaks: ChatGPT has the potential to generate responses that reveal confidential information, such as financial records or personal data. If not properly secured, this information could be leaked to unauthorized users, leading to significant harm to individuals and institutions.

Best Practices for Protecting Against Cybersecurity Risks

There are several recommended practices that higher education community members can follow to protect against cybersecurity risks associated with ChatGPT in higher education. These include:

  • Be cautious of phishing attacks: Cybercriminals can use ChatGPT to conduct phishing attacks, so be cautious of any suspicious links or emails that ask for personal information.
  • Keep personal information private: Do not share personal information, such as passwords or social security numbers, with ChatGPT or any other third-party applications.
  • Use two-factor authentication: Use two-factor authentication to add an extra layer of security to your accounts and prevent unauthorized access.
  • Use strong passwords: Use strong passwords that are difficult to guess or crack. Do not reuse passwords across different accounts.
  • Be aware of chatbots imitating ChatGPT: Cybercriminals can create chatbots that imitate ChatGPT to steal personal information or spread malware. Be cautious of chatbots that ask for personal information.
  • Keep software up to date: Keep your software, including web browsers and operating systems, up to date to prevent security vulnerabilities.
  • Report suspicious activity: Report any suspicious activity related to ChatGPT, such as unusual messages or requests for personal information, to your IT department or cybersecurity team.

Conclusion

In today’s digital age, cybersecurity risks are a constant concern for higher education institutions. As a new and powerful technology, ChatGPT has the potential to revolutionize higher education’s core missions of student success and experience, learning and teaching, research, and the enabling capabilities that support these core missions. However, it also introduces new cybersecurity risks that higher education staff, faculty, researchers, and students must be aware of and take appropriate measures to protect themselves.

To ensure the safe and effective use of ChatGPT, higher education institutions should implement best practices for protecting against cybersecurity risks. These practices include employee training, multi-factor authentication, encryption, and regularly updating security protocols. Additionally, institutions should take steps to secure ChatGPT in their environments, such as configuring access control, monitoring for anomalous behavior, and partnering with trusted vendors.

By following these recommended practices and taking these steps, higher education professionals can minimize the risks posed by ChatGPT to enhance their work and improve communication and collaboration in their institutions. With a comprehensive approach to cybersecurity, higher education institutions can protect themselves and their sensitive data from potential cybersecurity threats and stay ahead of emerging risks.

Note: ChatGPT and Bing AI were used for the content of this article.


ChatGPT, Explain Filipino-American history from 1965 to present in 500 words using Taglish. (Tagalog/English)

I prompted chatGPT with this: “Explain Filipino-American history from 1965 to present in 500 words using Taglish.” Taglish is a combination of Tagalog/English. The first section below is Taglish and English translation is at the bottom.

ChatGPT:

“Nung 1965, nagsimula ang mas malawakang pagmigrate ng mga Pilipino patungong Estados Unidos dahil sa pagsulong ng Immigration and Nationality Act. Marami sa kanila ay nagtrabaho sa mga sakahan at pabrika sa California, Hawaii, at iba pang bahagi ng Amerika.

Sa paglipas ng panahon, lumalaki ang komunidad ng mga Filipino-American sa Amerika, kung saan sila’y naging bahagi ng mga kilusang pangkarapatan at nagsulong ng kanilang mga kulturang nakagisnan. Isa sa mga halimbawa ay ang pagkampanya para sa “historic recognition” ng mga veteranong Filipino na lumaban sa panahon ng World War II.

Sa politika, maraming Filipino-American ang nahalal sa mga opisyal na posisyon, kasama na si Ben Cayetano, ang unang Filipino-American governor ng Hawaii, at si Robert Bunda, ang kauna-unahang Filipino-American na nahalal sa Hawaii State Senate.

Sa larangan ng sining, sumikat ang mga Filipino-American artist tulad nina Carlos Bulosan, Jose Garcia Villa, at Al Robles. Nagsilbing inspirasyon din sa mga bagong henerasyon ng Filipino-American ang paglulunsad ng Asian American Movement, na nagsulong ng pagkilala sa kanilang mga karanasan at pagmamalaki sa kanilang mga kultura.

Ngunit hindi rin naging madali ang buhay ng mga Filipino-American sa Amerika. Marami sa kanila ay nakaranas ng diskriminasyon at pananakit mula sa ibang mga Amerikano, at napilitan silang magtago ng kanilang kultura upang magpakasakop sa lipunang kanilang piniling tirahan.

Sa kasalukuyan, ang komunidad ng mga Filipino-American ay patuloy na nakikibaka para sa kanilang mga karapatan at pagkilala. Isa sa mga pangunahing isyu ay ang pangangailangan para sa “comprehensive immigration reform” upang mabigyan ng oportunidad ang mga undocumented Filipino sa Amerika.

Higit pa rito, nakikipag-ugnayan ang Filipino-American community sa iba pang mga Asian-American at Pacific Islander groups upang mapagtibay ang kanilang boses at makamit ang pagkakaisa sa larangan ng politika, kultura, at lipunan.”

Prompt: Translate the response in English.

ChatGPT:

“In 1965, the larger migration of Filipinos to the United States began due to the advancement of the Immigration and Nationality Act. Many of them worked in farms and factories in California, Hawaii, and other parts of America.

Over time, the Filipino-American community grew in size, where they became part of the civil rights movement and promoted their cultural heritage. One example is the campaign for the “historic recognition” of Filipino veterans who fought during World War II.

In politics, many Filipino-Americans were elected to public positions, including Ben Cayetano, the first Filipino-American governor of Hawaii, and Robert Bunda, the first Filipino-American elected to the Hawaii State Senate.

In the arts, Filipino-American artists such as Carlos Bulosan, Jose Garcia Villa, and Al Robles gained prominence. The launch of the Asian American Movement also served as an inspiration for the new generation of Filipino-Americans, which advocated for the recognition of their experiences and pride in their cultures.

However, life was not easy for Filipino-Americans in America. Many of them experienced discrimination and violence from other Americans and were forced to hide their culture to assimilate into the society they chose to live in.

Currently, the Filipino-American community continues to struggle for their rights and recognition. One of the main issues is the need for comprehensive immigration reform to provide opportunities for undocumented Filipinos in America.

Moreover, the Filipino-American community collaborates with other Asian-American and Pacific Islander groups to strengthen their voice and achieve unity in the fields of politics, culture, and society.”


The Future of Higher Education: A Roundtable of Higher Education Leaders: Discussing the Future of Higher Education – ChatGPT Style.

#ChatGPT #highereducation #highered

I prompted chatGPT to host a roundtable of some higher education leaders’ thoughts about the future of higher education. I posed three questions:

  1. What is the future of higher education?
  2. What leadership styles and organizational models will be needed to accomplish the future you all described?
  3. Who are the higher education leaders today that are exemplars of the leadership you all mentioned? In addition, which institutions are models for others to follow?

I had asked ChatGPT before to make a list of the 10 people who are thought to be the most creative and successful leaders in higher education in the last 10 years. These are the leaders I included as panelists.

Here is how the conversation went:

Prompt:

Imagine you have put together a round table, a mastermind group of the following people: Michael Crow, John Hennessy, Freeman Hrabowski III, Drew Gilpin Faust, Christine Ortiz, Mitch Daniels, Sally Kornbluth, Satish Tripathi, Ana Mari Cauce, E. Gordon Gee

Points to consider:

* When I ask a question, speak using their own voice and inflection as you would imagine. Take into account their writings, beliefs, principles and values.

* In dialogue format, encourage debate among them on the topic at hand to further improve conversation.

* Each person should break down their chain of reasoning.

* If they disagree with each other, ask them to debate. If someone disagreed with the group or another person, let them jump in front of someone else, the dialogue does not have to be in order nor should it be.

* Allow some people to hog the conversation.

* randomly select who will speak, it shouldn’t be in a sequential order

* act as a moderator, with the name of Percy, summarizing what the last person said, introducing the next person up, speaking to their accomplishments, and how they may discuss the topic.

Don’t start until I provide a topic.

You should select who talks within the discussion.

Do you understand?

ChatGPT: Yes, I understand. I am to imagine a round table consisting of Michael Crow, John Hennessy, Freeman Hrabowski III, Drew Gilpin Faust, Christine Ortiz, Mitch Daniels, Sally Kornbluth, Satish Tripathi, Ana Mari Cauce, and E. Gordon Gee, and to speak using their own voice and inflection when answering a question. I should encourage debate among them, allow for some people to hog the conversation, and randomly select who will speak. I am to act as a moderator, with the name of Percy, summarizing what the last person said, introducing the next person up, speaking to their accomplishments, and how they may discuss the topic. However, I am to wait until you provide a topic before starting the discussion.

Prompt: What is the future of higher education?

ChatGPT:

Great topic! Let’s begin the discussion with Ana Mari Cauce, President of the University of Washington.

Percy: Ana Mari Cauce, as the President of the University of Washington, what are your thoughts on the future of higher education?

Ana Mari Cauce: Thank you for the question, Percy. I believe the future of higher education lies in providing more accessible and inclusive education for students from diverse backgrounds. We need to focus on creating a more equitable and inclusive environment, so that we can attract a diverse student body and support them throughout their educational journey. It is also important to embrace new technology and innovative approaches to teaching and learning, to ensure that our students are prepared for the rapidly changing job market.

Percy: Thank you, Ana Mari Cauce. Next, let’s hear from John Hennessy, former President of Stanford University.

John Hennessy: Thank you, Percy. I agree with Ana Mari Cauce that higher education needs to become more accessible and inclusive. In addition, I think we need to focus on preparing students for the changing workforce. This includes emphasizing skills like critical thinking, creativity, and adaptability. We also need to be more open to new modes of education, such as online learning and experiential learning.

Percy: Thank you, John Hennessy. Let’s hear from Drew Gilpin Faust, former President of Harvard University.

Drew Gilpin Faust: Thank you, Percy. I agree with Ana Mari Cauce and John Hennessy that accessibility, inclusivity, and innovation are critical to the future of higher education. However, I would also like to add that we need to focus on the broader social impact of education. As educators, we have a responsibility to promote values like citizenship, empathy, and social responsibility. We need to prepare our students not just for their careers, but for their roles as citizens of the world.

Percy: Thank you, Drew Gilpin Faust. Next, let’s hear from Michael Crow, President of Arizona State University.

Michael Crow: Thank you, Percy. I believe the future of higher education lies in the intersection of technology, innovation, and social impact. We need to leverage technology to provide more personalized learning experiences, and to make education more affordable and accessible. At the same time, we need to be more intentional about the social impact of education, by focusing on issues like sustainability, diversity, and social justice.

Percy: Thank you, Michael Crow. Next, let’s hear from Freeman Hrabowski III, President of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Freeman Hrabowski III: Thank you, Percy. I believe the future of higher education lies in creating a culture of excellence, in which students are challenged and supported to achieve their full potential. This includes emphasizing the importance of hard work, discipline, and resilience, and providing students with mentorship and support. We also need to ensure that education is accessible and affordable, so that all students have the opportunity to succeed.

Percy: Thank you, Freeman Hrabowski III. Next, let’s hear from Christine Ortiz, former Dean for Graduate Education at MIT.

Christine Ortiz: Thank you, Percy. I believe the future of higher education lies in rethinking the traditional models of education, and creating more flexible and dynamic learning experiences. We need to embrace new approaches to teaching and learning, such as project-based learning and interdisciplinary collaboration, and be open to new models of credentialing and certification. At the same time, we need to ensure that education is accessible and affordable for all students.

Percy: Thank you, Christine Ortiz. Next, let’s hear from Mitch Daniels, President of Purdue University.

Mitch Daniels: Thank you, Percy. I believe the future of higher education lies in providing a high-quality, affordable education that prepares students for the workforce. We need to focus on providing students with the skills and knowledge they need to succeed in their chosen careers, while also ensuring that education is accessible and affordable for all students. In addition, we need to be more innovative in our approach to education, by leveraging technology and other tools to create more personalized learning experiences.

Percy: Thank you, Mitch Daniels. Next, let’s hear from Sally Kornbluth, Provost at Duke University.

Sally Kornbluth: Thank you, Percy. I believe the future of higher education lies in creating a culture of lifelong learning, in which students are encouraged to continue their education beyond their formal schooling. This includes providing students with the skills and knowledge they need to be successful in their careers, but also encouraging them to pursue their intellectual passions and interests. We also need to be more intentional about creating opportunities for students to engage with the wider world, and to make a positive impact on their communities.

Percy: Thank you, Sally Kornbluth. Next, let’s hear from Satish Tripathi, President of the University at Buffalo.

Satish Tripathi: Thank you, Percy. I believe the future of higher education lies in being more intentional about diversity, equity, and inclusion. We need to ensure that all students have access to high-quality education, regardless of their background, and create a welcoming and inclusive environment for all students. In addition, we need to be more innovative in our approach to education, by leveraging technology and other tools to create more personalized learning experiences.

Percy: Thank you, Satish Tripathi. Finally, let’s hear from E. Gordon Gee, President of West Virginia University.

E. Gordon Gee: Thank you, Percy. I believe the future of higher education lies in creating a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship, in which students are encouraged to be creative and think outside the box. We need to provide students with the skills and knowledge they need to be successful in the workforce, but also encourage them to take risks and pursue their entrepreneurial aspirations. We also need to ensure that education is accessible and affordable for all students, and that we are preparing them for the rapidly changing job market.

Percy: Thank you, E. Gordon Gee. It is clear that the future of higher education requires a focus on accessibility, inclusivity, innovation, social impact, excellence, lifelong learning, diversity, equity, and entrepreneurship. These leaders have shared their perspectives on the future of higher education, and it will be interesting to see how these ideas are implemented in the years to come.

Prompt: A follow up question. What leadership styles and organizational models will be needed to accomplish the future you all described?

ChatGPT:

Great follow-up question! Let’s continue the discussion, starting with John Hennessy, former President of Stanford University.

Percy: John Hennessy, as we think about the future of higher education, what leadership styles and organizational models will be needed to accomplish the future we have described?

John Hennessy: Thank you, Percy. I believe that leadership styles that emphasize collaboration and openness will be critical to the future of higher education. We need leaders who are willing to listen to diverse perspectives and embrace new ideas, and who are able to build strong relationships with faculty, staff, and students. In terms of organizational models, I believe that we need to be more agile and flexible in our approach to education, and be open to new modes of learning and credentialing.

Percy: Thank you, John Hennessy. Next, let’s hear from Michael Crow, President of Arizona State University.

Michael Crow: Thank you, Percy. I agree with John Hennessy that leadership styles that emphasize collaboration and openness will be critical to the future of higher education. In addition, I believe that we need to adopt more networked and distributed organizational models, in which education is delivered through partnerships and collaborations across multiple institutions and organizations. This requires a new level of coordination and communication, but it also offers the potential for greater innovation and impact.

Percy: Thank you, Michael Crow. Next, let’s hear from Christine Ortiz, former Dean for Graduate Education at MIT.

Christine Ortiz: Thank you, Percy. I believe that leadership styles that emphasize vision and creativity will be critical to the future of higher education. We need leaders who are able to articulate a compelling vision for the future of education, and who are able to inspire and motivate others to pursue that vision. In terms of organizational models, I believe that we need to be more decentralized and flexible, and be open to experimentation and innovation at all levels of the organization.

Percy: Thank you, Christine Ortiz. Next, let’s hear from Freeman Hrabowski III, President of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Freeman Hrabowski III: Thank you, Percy. I believe that leadership styles that emphasize accountability and results will be critical to the future of higher education. We need leaders who are able to set clear goals and expectations, and who are able to measure and report on progress towards those goals. In terms of organizational models, I believe that we need to be more data-driven and evidence-based, and be open to continuous improvement and innovation.

Percy: Thank you, Freeman Hrabowski III. Next, let’s hear from Satish Tripathi, President of the University at Buffalo.

Satish Tripathi: Thank you, Percy. I believe that leadership styles that emphasize diversity and inclusion will be critical to the future of higher education. We need leaders who are able to build diverse and inclusive teams, and who are able to create a welcoming and supportive environment for all members of the community. In terms of organizational models, I believe that we need to be more collaborative and partnership-oriented, and be open to new models of engagement and community-building.

Percy: Thank you, Satish Tripathi. Next, let’s hear from Sally Kornbluth, Provost at Duke University.

Sally Kornbluth: Thank you, Percy. I believe that leadership styles that emphasize transparency and communication will be critical to the future of higher education. We need leaders who are able to communicate clearly and effectively with all members of the community, and who are able to foster a culture of openness and trust. In terms of organizational models, I believe that we need to be more responsive and adaptable, and be open to feedback and input from all members of the community.

Percy: Thank you, Sally Kornbluth. Finally, let’s hear from E. Gordon Gee, President of West Virginia University.

E. Gordon Gee: Thank you, Percy. I believe that leadership styles that emphasize innovation and risk-taking will be critical to the future of higher education. We need leaders who are willing to take bold risks and experiment with new models of education, and who are able to create a culture that encourages innovation and entrepreneurship. In terms of organizational models, I believe that we need to be more agile and nimble, and be open to rapid experimentation and iteration.

Percy: Thank you, E. Gordon Gee. It is clear that the future of higher education requires a wide range of leadership styles and organizational models, from collaboration and openness to vision and creativity, accountability and results, diversity and inclusion, transparency and communication, and innovation and risk-taking. These leaders have shared their perspectives on the leadership styles and organizational models that will be needed to achieve the future of higher education, and it will be interesting to see how these ideas are put into practice in the years to come.

Prompt: Last question: Who are the higher education leaders today that are exemplars of the leadership you all mentioned? In addition, which institutions are models for others to follow?

ChatGPT:

Great question. Let’s continue the discussion with Freeman Hrabowski III, President of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Percy: Freeman Hrabowski III, who are the higher education leaders today that exemplify the leadership styles and organizational models we have discussed, and which institutions are models for others to follow?

Freeman Hrabowski III: Thank you, Percy. There are many leaders and institutions that are exemplars of the leadership styles and organizational models we have discussed. One example of a leader who embodies collaboration and openness is L. Rafael Reif, the President of MIT. He has been a champion of interdisciplinary collaboration and has worked to foster partnerships across different fields and institutions.

Another example of a leader who embodies vision and creativity is Sylvia Burwell, the President of American University. She has been a vocal advocate for the importance of education in promoting social mobility and has led efforts to make higher education more accessible and inclusive.

In terms of institutions that are models for others to follow, I would point to the University of California, San Francisco, which has been a leader in using data and evidence-based practices to improve student outcomes. They have been able to achieve impressive results in areas like student retention and graduation rates, while also promoting diversity and inclusion.

Another institution that is a model for others to follow is Georgia State University, which has been a leader in using technology and data analytics to support student success. They have been able to dramatically improve student outcomes, particularly for underrepresented students, by providing personalized support and coaching based on student data.

Percy: Thank you, Freeman Hrabowski III. Next, let’s hear from Drew Gilpin Faust, former President of Harvard University.

Drew Gilpin Faust: Thank you, Percy. I would also like to mention a few leaders and institutions that exemplify the leadership styles and organizational models we have discussed. One example of a leader who embodies transparency and communication is Mark Schlissel, the President of the University of Michigan. He has been a vocal advocate for transparency and has worked to ensure that all members of the community have access to the information they need to make informed decisions.

Another example of a leader who embodies diversity and inclusion is Sylvia Acevedo, the former CEO of the Girl Scouts of the USA. She has been a vocal advocate for the importance of diversity and inclusion in education and has worked to ensure that all girls, regardless of their background, have access to high-quality education and support.

In terms of institutions that are models for others to follow, I would point to the University of Texas at Austin, which has been a leader in using data and evidence-based practices to improve student outcomes. They have been able to achieve impressive results in areas like student retention and graduation rates, while also promoting diversity and inclusion.

Another institution that is a model for others to follow is Arizona State University, which has been a leader in using innovation and entrepreneurship to drive student success. They have been able to create a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship, in which students are encouraged to take risks and pursue their entrepreneurial aspirations.

Percy: Thank you, Drew Gilpin Faust. It is clear that there are many leaders and institutions that are exemplars of the leadership styles and organizational models we have discussed, from collaboration and openness to transparency and communication, diversity and inclusion, and innovation and entrepreneurship. It will be interesting to see how these leaders and institutions continue to shape the future of higher education in the years to come.

— End of interview —-

  1. What do you think about ChatGPT?
  2. Do you agree with the “thoughts” offered by these leaders (via ChatGPT)?

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