Category Archives: Student Affairs

ACPA/NASPA Technology Competency for Professional Development

The  technology competency in the latest ACPA/NASPA Technology Competency (2015) and the corresponding rubric provide student affairs practitioners and administrators guidance on how to effectively learn and apply technology in their roles as educators and programmers for student success. In addition, the two documents are also useful to the same groups when it comes to self-directed and formal professional development.

In my role as student affairs IT director, educator, and student affairs administrator, I was very interested with the technology competency when it became available and how it could be applied to my organization and for my personal learning. I’ve offered my thoughts in this blog post.

I found the competency and the rubric to be useful for the following reasons:

1) I’m able to identify areas I need to pursue. For example, most of my experiential learning and training have been mostly on “technical tools and software” and “data use and compliance” so when I planned my schedule for the NASPA national conference in San Antonio next week (March 10-15), I purposely planned my schedule to attend sessions on “digital identity and citizenship” and “online learning environments”.

2) As I defined areas I need further development, I began to explore other methods of learning. For example, most of my education when it comes to technology the last three years have been through my job and also through kindle books. This year, I discovered Lynda.com videos and I have completed seven courses in data governance and security.

3) The techniques and mindset I have developed through the technology competency have also led me to applying them in other development areas beyond technology. Just recently, I completed a 10 course series on people management certification via the University of California online learning system.

4) Given the lessons learned from my experience in applying the competency and rubric, I am in the process of developing a training curriculum for our division of student affairs based on the competency and rubric with the support of our Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs.  My hope is that by next year’s NASPA conference, we would have implemented the curriculum and present our experience so other student affairs practitioners and administrators may consider using the competency for theirs institutions as well.

Dr. Josie Ahlquist, and I presented via webinar (Infusing The New Student Affairs Technology Competency Into Practice) last month, on how the competency could be applied in graduate programs, student affairs organizations, and for professional development. Part of the presentation focused on the use of the competency for professional development. I offered how I have used and how I plan on using the competency and the rubric to guide my learning. Using Excel, I created a template that lists learning activities, when I would pursue them, the format, and which areas of the technology competency rubrics these activities fulfill. The template also provides a link to the rubric.

Attached is the Excel file I developed and please feel free to modify them for your use. Click on the image to download the file.

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I look forward to how other institutions and student affairs professionals apply the competency and rubric. If you or your institution have used these tools, I would love to learn more about them.

Conquering My Fear of Public Speaking

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Presentation for graduate students on digital reputation at the Beyond Academic conference at UCSB. [photo courtesy of Don Lubach]

Do you have a fear of public speaking? Do you get anxious and nervous days and even weeks before you’re to speak? I certainly was for most of my life. When I was in elementary school, I pretended to be sick during the days of oral book reports. Throughout high school I dreaded speaking in front of the class and one of the most painful three months or so of my life was when I was informed I had to speak at our graduation ceremony in front of a couple of thousands of people because I was the class Salutatorian. The prospect of doing the speech terrified me. Instead of enjoying the graduation ceremony and the months leading up to it, I was very anxious. In college, I had similar experiences. I still remember one particular year how terrified I was days leading up to when I had to speak in front of about 800 or so people at our campus, in front of parents and friends, at our annual show for the Filipino-American student organization.

Throughout my professional career, I felt hampered by my fear of public speaking until I decided to make a conscious effort to finally conquer it about three years ago. I felt as I had some good perspectives/ideas to share but I did not have the confidence to share them. Using the steps I share below, I’ve been able to enjoy public speaking and I now look forward to them. In the last four years, I have spoken and presented in several public settings on my campus and even at a couple of professional conferences. I always dreamed of being a “keynote speaker” or doing a webinar but I never thought I would have the opportunity because of my fear. I honestly would not have imagined being able to speak comfortably in front of many people but by conquering my fear of public speaking, I have been able to realize some dreams, present with colleagues I respect, and meet new folks and develop relationships with them.

Here are some of what I did which hopefully could help you too:

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Guest presenter at a marketing course when my I couldn’t use my PowerPoint slides. It became an even better session as it became a dialogue/conversation with the class.

1) Think about the root(s) of your fear and how to overcome them. When I finally started to deeply think about what made me nervous about public speaking through the years, it always came back to the idea that as one whose first language is Ilokano (a Filipino dialect), I was scared of being made fun of because I may “FOB” (fresh off the boat) accent. I was eleven when I immigrated to the US with my family, and I remember being made fun of by other kids because of how I spoke. That impacted me psychologically and it contributed to the anxiety I felt before I spoke in public. The other fear that I had was that when I’m nervous, I had (and still do)  the tendency to speak very fast. So, the possibility of “Fobbing” and speaking really fast, especially the first couple of sentences of my speech, really terrified me. However, as I thought about my past speeches, it dawned on me that once I started speaking, I was actually okay! Once I got going, I felt comfortable. it was the first couple of sentences that really scared me. Given this knowledge, I purposely practice my introductory statements to be really slow and deliberate because I realized that if I could get through my first couple of sentences fine, I’m good with the rest of the speech or even a whole hour or two workshop. This step has saved me from days and even weeks of anxiety.

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Panelist on student affairs career development at our campus.

2) Get experience public speaking. I really made it a point to seek out opportunities to speak. When asked to do workshops on mobile, social media, and web development or about my personal experiences as a first generation minority student, I accepted them even as terrified as I was. These are areas I have expertise and comfortable talking about so the content was not a problem for me. The more I spoke about these topics, the easier the experience became for me. What really helped in my initial effort to conquer my fear is that I asked a couple of my colleagues who are very good public speakers to join me for my workshops. By doing that, I felt less vulnerable and I gained the experience in the process. They became my crutches until I was ready to do events on my own. The more I spoke, the more comfortable I became.

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Keynote speaker for an outreach program for Filipino-American high school students.

3) Develop a niche area (or areas) you can feel comfortable speaking and understand your natural style. As mentioned above, there are topics I feel comfortable talking about and the more I had the opportunity speak about them, the better I got in my presentation styles, delivery, and content. I look back at my first few PowerPoint presentations and I cringe at the amount of text I had per slide! I was using the slides as my crutches because I did not feel comfortable talking without reading what’s on the slides. Nowadays, I’ve come to rely more on the slides to augment/enhance my points through visuals and short text snippets. The slides are now intended for the audience rather than for me. There was actually one time when I was a guest speaker for a marketing course and I had my PowerPoint presentation ready but because the instructor could not login to the computer, I spoke for about an hour without slides. It was actually one of my best presentations because it was conversational and free-flowing. With regards to style, I came to realize that I felt most comfortable and effective when I walked around and not behind a podium. I feel most comfortable when I felt as if the presentation was a conversation and not a monologue. I’ve developed a cadence in how I speak and how I move around when speaking. Engaging with the audience has become one of my habits when speaking.

There are additional steps I’ve learned along the process of conquering public speaking, but three advice above have been the most helpful for me. Try them out and go share your ideas to the world!

 

Big Hairy Audacious Goals (BHAG)

dream_bigSetting big dreams is fun, isn’t it? My wife and I commute to work together and there are days when we talk about all the possibilities ahead of us. We figure it doesn’t cost us anything and if we’re going to dream anyway, we’ll dream big beyond our imaginations and beyond our realities as we see them now.

Personally, thee last few months have proven to be fruitful so far. Some of what I consider Big Hairy Audacious Goals (BHAG) have come/or in the process of becoming realities. BHAG is a term I came across from the book called “Built To Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies” by Jim Collins. The idea behind BHAG in this book is that visionary companies used bold and daunting missions to stimulate progress. I just recently read the book so I didn’t know this term even existed but it seems the goals I had set for myself would qualify as BHAGs. They may not be audacious goals for other folks, but these goals certainly are for me.

These personal BHAGs may not have been in the form I originally envisioned them to be, but nevertheless, they’re close to what I had in mind. In addition, some of these goals are personally scary for me. I figured I will just have to conquer my fears as I come across them. Another important note – these goals needed the help of other folks to make them happen! Without folks who believed in me and the ideas themselves, they would have never happened.

Here are some of my BHAGs that have become realities:

SA_Exec_TeamA seat at the Senior Student Affairs Officers (SSAO) table in my role as IT Director.  I became a member of my campus’ Student Affairs Executive Team in December. In this blog post, Case for Technology Leadership at the SSAO Table, I wrote about the values of having someone in a senior technology management role at the table who can bring technical expertise and perspective as strategic decisions are made.

A campus-wide IT leadership/management professional development program. With the support of our new CIO Matt Hall, we have begun planning for a campus-wide program to promote community-building as well as leadership/mgmt and technical training for IT professionals. Along with our CIO, we have a team consisting of IT Directors as well as HR managers that’s in the process of formulating our goals and program activities. This is an idea I had proposed on this blog post – Cohort-Based IT Leadership Program for Higher Education.

NASPA Technology Knowledge Community (TKC) Chair. This is a position that seemed out of reach for me and one that I may not be qualified for, given the significance and scope of the TKC. However, as mentioned in this post (Sharing Our Vision at #NASPA16: Updates from the TKC Chair), I think I can contribute to advancing technology in student affairs by broadening the scope of conversation and those involved in the discussions through the chair position.  With the help of an amazing team, the community members, and the current chair, Lisa Endersby, I can’t wait to see what we’ll do in the next couple of years!

A webcast on student affairs and technology. A couple of weeks ago, the opportunity to do a webcast finally happened with the webcast “What AVPS and Mid-Level Professionals Need to Know About Technology” with Eric Stoller and Stephanie Gordon. It was a challenge for me given that I am not always sure of how much I know about the topic and how I may come across on a live discussion when folks are watching from all places.

joe_before_afterLose 45 pounds in 10 months. Never in my wildest dream would I ever thought I’d accomplish this. After all, I’ve tried in the past to lose weight, but for various reasons, I just couldn’t make it happen. Here is a blog post, How I lost 20 Pounds in 3 Months, of what I found to work (written three months after I started the weight loss attempt).

 

 

As I had mentioned, my wife and I have a list of BHAGs and those shall remain a secret to us and who knows if they’ll ever come to fruition. It is fun though to work towards them and to think about the possibilities. Professionally, I see the next three years as potentially significant for me. With a mixture of luck, preparation, and with the help of many folks – I do hope they’ll happen.

What are you BHAGs?

Photo of goldfish with shark fin courtesy of: https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CZwxYtFWwAIclAj.jpg

 

What Defines a Student Affairs Professional?

What is a student affairs professional? This seems like an easy question yet I haven’t found a definitive answer. When I see questions such as “do student affairs professionals need a Master’s degree?”, I wonder even further as to what folks are referring to as professionals. In a typical student affairs organization, there are different classifications of jobs that make up the organization. For example, in UCSB Student Affairs Division, there are more than 30 units and within these units are folks assigned to different roles. For example, in student health service, we have physicians, medical assistants, administrative assistants, business officers, and store room staff. We also have an IT unit consisting of technology professionals as well administrative staff. In our Disabled Student Services office, we have advisors, adaptive technology staff, and again, administrative staff.

Given the sample of roles in our division mentioned above, I have to think that not everyone in the division needs Masters degree to do their jobs. However, I must ask, “if student affairs professionals do need Master’s degree, what qualifies one to be a student affairs professional?” That a staff works in a student affairs organization, does that qualify them to be considered “student affairs professional”, are there particular roles within student affairs organizations that are “professionals”,  or does one need some educational credential to be considered one?

What do you think?

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Click on image above to view pdf version.

 

The Benefits of Building/Managing Your Digital Reputation

Reputation can be defined as other people’s perceptions of a person’s character. In the realm of digital space, including social media, reputation is built on 1) the content a person produces or shares (tweets, blog posts, photos, videos, …) and their interactions with others (digital footprint) and 2) what others share about a person (digital shadow). The terms digital footprint and digital shadow are coined by Eric Qualman.

This post is about some of the benefits I’ve personally received by having an intentional digital presence through my blog, twitter, linkedininstagram, pinterest, goodreads, slideshare, and facebook.  When I joined the social media platforms I mentioned a few years ago, I could never have imagined the folks I would meet which led to professional collaborations and opportunities that have come my way. I’ve also developed some friendships along the way. I share the following list to illustrate how a person such as myself who, in my opinion, is no different than most folks in my professions (student affairs, higher ed IT) can benefit from having a positive presence online.

  • Elected as NASPA Technology Knowledge Community Chair (2017-2019).
  • Hired as consultant by two universities to lead an external program review team.
  • Co-present sessions on social media at a couple of conferences.
  • Invitation to NASPA Technology Summit in Washington, DC.
  • Invitation to contribute an article on NASPA Leadership Exchange Magazine.
  • Invitation to co-author a chapter on Student Affairs technology.
  • Accepted as an assessor to a UC Leadership program based on my blog posts about leadership.
  • Invitation to speak to student affairs grad students on digital reputation.
  • Invitation to be a guest on a podcast to talk about student affairs technology.
  • Opportunities to speak on digital reputation and alternative professional development for multiple groups at UCSB.

When I share my perspectives online, I’m not always sure how others receive my message. Even with the best and clear intentions, my messages are received in many ways. Given that realization, I’ve developed some principles that guide how I present myself and how I interact with others online. Some of my main principles include:

  • Be honest.

When folks including my Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, our campus CIO, my colleagues, students, my family and friends, and other professionals I respect follow me on social media, I better be consistent and honest with what I share.

  • Be kind in how you relate with others.

Even when I’ve disagreed with other folks, I always try to maintain respect as I would like to be   treated with the same kindness myself. One of the limitations of social media is that one does not get the full context of what is being shared or how a person may act.

  • Aim to provide value to others.

With my blog, I started primarily writing about my personal and professional interests. I’ve found my blog as a way to release my frustrations related to my experience as a person of color and share my visions of what I think student affairs and technology may hold in the future.  While I still primarily write for myself, I’ve found that others do relate to the topics I write about. I get messages from folks who tell me how a blog post prompted them to re-frame their thoughts or how they can relate to my experience, specifically about racism and discrimination.

Another way I’ve found myself to be of value is by connecting folks from different circles of my life. Just like I do in conferences or parties, it’s fun to be able to introduce friends and colleagues who may share interests and then gently step away so they can have the space to continue the conversation themselves.

I do have some missteps from time to time and I don’t always follow my principles, I’m human after all, but I do strive to apply the principles I mentioned above.

I hope my post has convinced you (if not already) that building/maintaining a positive digital presence do have some benefits. Please let me know if I could provide you some ideas on how to get started.

How about you? How are you managing your digital presence and what principles do you use?