Author Archives: Joe Sabado

ACPA/NASPA Technology Competency for Professional Development

The  technology competency in the latest ACPA/NASPA Technology Competency (2015) and the corresponding rubric provide student affairs practitioners and administrators guidance on how to effectively learn and apply technology in their roles as educators and programmers for student success. In addition, the two documents are also useful to the same groups when it comes to self-directed and formal professional development.

In my role as student affairs IT director, educator, and student affairs administrator, I was very interested with the technology competency when it became available and how it could be applied to my organization and for my personal learning. I’ve offered my thoughts in this blog post.

I found the competency and the rubric to be useful for the following reasons:

1) I’m able to identify areas I need to pursue. For example, most of my experiential learning and training have been mostly on “technical tools and software” and “data use and compliance” so when I planned my schedule for the NASPA national conference in San Antonio next week (March 10-15), I purposely planned my schedule to attend sessions on “digital identity and citizenship” and “online learning environments”.

2) As I defined areas I need further development, I began to explore other methods of learning. For example, most of my education when it comes to technology the last three years have been through my job and also through kindle books. This year, I discovered Lynda.com videos and I have completed seven courses in data governance and security.

3) The techniques and mindset I have developed through the technology competency have also led me to applying them in other development areas beyond technology. Just recently, I completed a 10 course series on people management certification via the University of California online learning system.

4) Given the lessons learned from my experience in applying the competency and rubric, I am in the process of developing a training curriculum for our division of student affairs based on the competency and rubric with the support of our Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs.  My hope is that by next year’s NASPA conference, we would have implemented the curriculum and present our experience so other student affairs practitioners and administrators may consider using the competency for theirs institutions as well.

Dr. Josie Ahlquist, and I presented via webinar (Infusing The New Student Affairs Technology Competency Into Practice) last month, on how the competency could be applied in graduate programs, student affairs organizations, and for professional development. Part of the presentation focused on the use of the competency for professional development. I offered how I have used and how I plan on using the competency and the rubric to guide my learning. Using Excel, I created a template that lists learning activities, when I would pursue them, the format, and which areas of the technology competency rubrics these activities fulfill. The template also provides a link to the rubric.

Attached is the Excel file I developed and please feel free to modify them for your use. Click on the image to download the file.

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I look forward to how other institutions and student affairs professionals apply the competency and rubric. If you or your institution have used these tools, I would love to learn more about them.

Conquering My Fear of Public Speaking

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Presentation for graduate students on digital reputation at the Beyond Academic conference at UCSB. [photo courtesy of Don Lubach]

Do you have a fear of public speaking? Do you get anxious and nervous days and even weeks before you’re to speak? I certainly was for most of my life. When I was in elementary school, I pretended to be sick during the days of oral book reports. Throughout high school I dreaded speaking in front of the class and one of the most painful three months or so of my life was when I was informed I had to speak at our graduation ceremony in front of a couple of thousands of people because I was the class Salutatorian. The prospect of doing the speech terrified me. Instead of enjoying the graduation ceremony and the months leading up to it, I was very anxious. In college, I had similar experiences. I still remember one particular year how terrified I was days leading up to when I had to speak in front of about 800 or so people at our campus, in front of parents and friends, at our annual show for the Filipino-American student organization.

Throughout my professional career, I felt hampered by my fear of public speaking until I decided to make a conscious effort to finally conquer it about three years ago. I felt as I had some good perspectives/ideas to share but I did not have the confidence to share them. Using the steps I share below, I’ve been able to enjoy public speaking and I now look forward to them. In the last four years, I have spoken and presented in several public settings on my campus and even at a couple of professional conferences. I always dreamed of being a “keynote speaker” or doing a webinar but I never thought I would have the opportunity because of my fear. I honestly would not have imagined being able to speak comfortably in front of many people but by conquering my fear of public speaking, I have been able to realize some dreams, present with colleagues I respect, and meet new folks and develop relationships with them.

Here are some of what I did which hopefully could help you too:

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Guest presenter at a marketing course when my I couldn’t use my PowerPoint slides. It became an even better session as it became a dialogue/conversation with the class.

1) Think about the root(s) of your fear and how to overcome them. When I finally started to deeply think about what made me nervous about public speaking through the years, it always came back to the idea that as one whose first language is Ilokano (a Filipino dialect), I was scared of being made fun of because I may “FOB” (fresh off the boat) accent. I was eleven when I immigrated to the US with my family, and I remember being made fun of by other kids because of how I spoke. That impacted me psychologically and it contributed to the anxiety I felt before I spoke in public. The other fear that I had was that when I’m nervous, I had (and still do)  the tendency to speak very fast. So, the possibility of “Fobbing” and speaking really fast, especially the first couple of sentences of my speech, really terrified me. However, as I thought about my past speeches, it dawned on me that once I started speaking, I was actually okay! Once I got going, I felt comfortable. it was the first couple of sentences that really scared me. Given this knowledge, I purposely practice my introductory statements to be really slow and deliberate because I realized that if I could get through my first couple of sentences fine, I’m good with the rest of the speech or even a whole hour or two workshop. This step has saved me from days and even weeks of anxiety.

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Panelist on student affairs career development at our campus.

2) Get experience public speaking. I really made it a point to seek out opportunities to speak. When asked to do workshops on mobile, social media, and web development or about my personal experiences as a first generation minority student, I accepted them even as terrified as I was. These are areas I have expertise and comfortable talking about so the content was not a problem for me. The more I spoke about these topics, the easier the experience became for me. What really helped in my initial effort to conquer my fear is that I asked a couple of my colleagues who are very good public speakers to join me for my workshops. By doing that, I felt less vulnerable and I gained the experience in the process. They became my crutches until I was ready to do events on my own. The more I spoke, the more comfortable I became.

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Keynote speaker for an outreach program for Filipino-American high school students.

3) Develop a niche area (or areas) you can feel comfortable speaking and understand your natural style. As mentioned above, there are topics I feel comfortable talking about and the more I had the opportunity speak about them, the better I got in my presentation styles, delivery, and content. I look back at my first few PowerPoint presentations and I cringe at the amount of text I had per slide! I was using the slides as my crutches because I did not feel comfortable talking without reading what’s on the slides. Nowadays, I’ve come to rely more on the slides to augment/enhance my points through visuals and short text snippets. The slides are now intended for the audience rather than for me. There was actually one time when I was a guest speaker for a marketing course and I had my PowerPoint presentation ready but because the instructor could not login to the computer, I spoke for about an hour without slides. It was actually one of my best presentations because it was conversational and free-flowing. With regards to style, I came to realize that I felt most comfortable and effective when I walked around and not behind a podium. I feel most comfortable when I felt as if the presentation was a conversation and not a monologue. I’ve developed a cadence in how I speak and how I move around when speaking. Engaging with the audience has become one of my habits when speaking.

There are additional steps I’ve learned along the process of conquering public speaking, but three advice above have been the most helpful for me. Try them out and go share your ideas to the world!

 

Organizational Change Leadership

A mentor once said “you manage constraints and you lead towards possibilities”. Another colleague also told me “you manage things and you lead people.” When it comes to organizational change, these two principles also apply. Organizational change leadership deals with how one influences other people to buy-in and commit to changes and/or new ideas. As one who is in a leadership position and also who has been fortunate to have observed other effective change leaders, here are some principles I’ve come to adopt when I am leading change.

1. Go with the willing first. Realize that different folks in the organization will not be at the same level of awareness and interest when it comes to new ideas. For folks to buy-in, they must first be made aware of the proposed changes and they themselves then must commit to accepting or rejecting the idea. Some folks, given their disposition, personalities, and interests will be more willing and able to accept the proposed changes. These are the folks who can provide initial positive momentum and interests that will not only advance the implementation of the proposed change but in the process will demonstrate to others the values of the changes as well. I’ve seen it too often and I’ve experienced this myself when leaders are discouraged with their efforts and lack of progress because they focus too much on those who are unwilling to adopt the changes and the criticisms levied by those folks. But, in focusing on those who are willing, progress will be made and positive energy/momentum will be sustained.

2. Engage influencers in the organization. There are individuals in organizations who have the credibility and respect of their peers. These are folks who are not always in management positions, rather these are folks who are liked socially, have the reputation for getting things done, and who management can count on to get things done. These are folks that can be very beneficial in getting the buy-in of others so when leading change, they should be approached at the beginning and throughout the efforts so they know what’s going on, for them to develop interests in the new idea, and spread the message with their peers.

3. Use the social network effect. Related to points 1 and 2 above, create/promote a social structure where folks can share ideas in social settings. I’ve learned that department meetings are forums for announcements/awareness but I’m not going to convince folks in one session to develop interests in changes being proposed. Realize that when folks go to lunches, go on breaks, that’s when they often have deeper conversations about what’s going on with the departments. For this reason, it’s important to work with the folks who are willing and who are the organizational influencers who can then advocate for the change during these casual and social conversations.

Organizational change can be emotional and psychologically hard on people because it impacts their identity, their value systems, their reputation, and their livelihood. For these reasons, folks leading organizational changes cannot overlook the significance of the individual needs and interests of those involved. In the end, folks are asking this question when it comes to change – “what’s in it for me?”

What other methods and principles have you used to successfully lead organizational changes?

My Personal Values & Principles and Thoughts on Student Affairs, Technology, and Leadership

I started my blog because I needed a place to share ideas and process my thoughts. Six years later since my first post on October 21, 2010, I have posted 383 articles on professional and personal topics. As I read through what I have written, it’s fascinating how in some ways my perspectives have evolved yet some of my core principles have not changed. Listed below are thoughts on my personal values and principles, leadership, and student affairs and technology.

Personal Values and Principles

Reasons I Value Diversity and Inclusion in The Workplace
I was interviewed for a course on ethical leadership a couple of months ago. One of the questions was what drives my value system and priorities at work.  I suppose I had not thought of this before, but it was during that interview that I realized providing equal access to opportunities, inclusion, and appreciating diversity are very important values of mine.   As I was asked additional questions about why these were so important to me, I realized it was my experiences feeling marginalized while growing up, in college, and even at work when I did not fit in the norms that really drive me to ensure those around me have the opportunities to be included and differences are valued. [More …]

A Reflection on My Career in Student Affairs
Where I find most personal satisfaction is working with students and the other activities outside my technologist role. Serving in  student fee advisory committeestudent resource team, reading admissions applications, and serving as student organization advisor provide me with reminders of who I am ultimately serving, the students, and that I am able to somehow make a difference in their lives is what motivates me. As an aside, moving forward with new technologies like social media and mobile web, I have also found these activities very critical to my understanding of the culture and trends of students today. [More…]

Reflecting on Why I Love My Job in Student Affairs
If I view my job in student affairs IT as just about computers, I’m missing the bigger picture. In the end, it’s about helping students succeed through technology and my roles as discussion leader, organizational advisor, mentor, and a facilitator. In my role as the director/leader in my IT organization, it’s about helping my staff and my colleagues grow, create an environment where they feel personally satisfied with what they do and that they feel they are contributing. Ultimately, my job is about helping people and helping build communities. I am also part of the UCSB community. [More…]

Nowhere I’d Rather Be Than in Student Affairs
It is during the most challenging times of my job when I find myself thinking how blessed I am to have my job in student affairs, specifically as an IT leader within student affairs. The sometimes convoluted nature of higher education bureaucracy, the pressure of having to deliver critical technology services with the limited amount of resources, and having to juggle competing priorities make it challenging some days. But, even with these challenges, actually, because of these challenges, that I feel blessed to have my job. I can easily look beyond the day-to-day frustrations because I know that at the end of the day, what matters is that my colleagues and I, the work we do, have a very important purpose – to help students succeed. [More…]

UCSB STEP Program – Nourishment for My Soul
Personally, STEP program provides me with the opportunity to build connections with the students and even if most of them will never contact me again, I consider it such a privilege and honor to be a part of their introduction to their new lives at UCSB. My one-week STEP experience is enough to provide nourishment for my soul to provide me with the motivation and sense of purpose for the rest of the year. [More…]

Why I Love My Job in Student Affairs at UCSB
Through technologies, I help serve the UCSB community so students may successfully navigate the university and prepare them for their careers and develop as human beings. However, it is through the personal connections I’ve made with the few students that really makes me realize how blessed I am to be in a position wherein I can make a difference in their lives. [More…]

Pilipino Graduation and What My Job Really Means
One of the reasons why I actively seek out opportunities to work with students, in addition to the fact that I do find enjoyment working with them, is because I do feel that for me to be able to do my job effectively; I need to be reminded of who I serve. These are students who have come to the university for different reasons, with different aspirations.  For many of them, attending UCSB required their families to sacrifice. These are students who must find ways to succeed at the university against increasing tuition and declining resources. [More…]

Thoughts on Leadership

My Professional Vision as Higher Education IT Leader (DRAFT)
How often, or have you thought about your core ideologies and your future as a professional? I personally haven’t myself but as I lead my organization through a strategic planning process and as I learn more about how to develop successful organizations, I began to think about how I could apply that process for me personally. Using ideas from a book by Jim Collins called “Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies”, I came up with some initial thoughts below. [More…]

IT Organizational Management & Leadership
One of the lessons I’ve learned is that to be an effective organizational leader you need to be an effective manager and to be an effective manager, you need to be an effective leader. In short, leadership and management go hand in hand when it comes to delivering results. [More…]

Leading in Stressful Times
As managers, don’t lose sight of the idea that our staff are human beings and not just units of resources. If organizations are to be productive, managers must make themselves available and build relationships with staff to build an engaged workforce. Being too short-sighted and just giving orders to complete tasks can lead to unintended and counterproductive consequences. [More…]

Assertiveness: My Leadership Challenge as an Asian American
Throughout my career, one personal trait that’s been perceived as negative when it came to my leadership style has been my assertiveness, or rather lack of. From the feedback I’ve received, I’ve been seen as not direct and not confrontational when dealing with conflicts. Whether that’s because of my personality or because of my cultural upbringing, I don’t know why I have not been seen as “assertive” as other folks would like me to be. [More..]

My IT Organization’s Guiding Values and Principles
As I’ve been with my organization for more than 15 years, I have a good sense of our culture, our strengths, capabilities, and areas of improvements. I firmly believe that we are a very capable organization proven by what we’ve been able to do and we can continue/improve our delivery of quality solutions and excellent customer service. We have a dedicated, highly knowledgeable and skilled team with strong support from our senior management. It is for these reasons that I strive for the idea that when people think of THE model higher education IT, they think UCSB SIS&T!  

I believe the guiding values and principles of my organization have to be able to stand through time in the midst of ever-changing technology landscapes and dynamic customer services and needs. It is with this mindset that these guiding values and principles were formulated. [More…]

Leadership is About Connecting, More than Communicating
Leadership in my opinion is about influence, not control. A leader’s ability to influence others ultimately comes down to how they are perceived by those they lead. Leaders who can establish connections, who can make others feel like they matter and they are understood are the ones who will have the most influence. [More…]

Leadership – Bruce Lee style
“I can best describe Joe Sabado as the ‘Bruce Lee’ of managers.  People would ask Bruce Lee what his ‘system’ was, and he would say he didn’t have a ‘system’.  His style was the style of no style.  Likewise, Joe doesn’t have a management style, because no single method works with everyone, or at all times.”

 “Joe is a master at understanding people, and their current situation.  Joe always looks to adapt himself to the other person, and even to the other person’s mood.” [More…]

My Perspective on IT Leadership for 2012
The demands of our customers and employees are changing fast and as an organization, our ability to adapt, not react is critical.  One challenge I see in my position then ishow to promote our core mission while keeping up with the trends. [More…]

Student Affairs and Technology

Student Affairs Digital Technology for Student Success
Academic and co-curricular programs, student services, enrollment management services, and other administrative services offered by highered institutions are aimed to support and promote student learning, development, and success. [More…]

Student Affairs Org Technology Leadership Competencies – MindMap
What are the competencies required to be an effective student affairs technology leader at an organizational level? This is a question I pondered while reviewing the Technology Competency Area within the ACPA/NASPA Professional Competency Area for Student Affairs Educators. I specifically mentioned “at an organizational level” because managing/leading the appropriate/effective use of technology at the divisional level is different from one who is leading the efforts at the national or individual levels. [More…]

Technology Responsibilities & Qualifications for Senior Student Affairs Officers
I do think technology leadership needs to be present at the highest level of student affairs organizations. At the minimum, CSAOs cannot abdicate their roles as information technology managers and they must either develop the skills, knowledge, and dispositions as described in the new technology competency area and/or include a position that can provide leadership to lead the effective adoption, utilization, and assessment/evaluation of technology in student affairs. [More…]

Future of Student Affairs and Information Technology

Dean of Student Affairs Technology – A Proposed Role
How come there are Dean of Academic Technology positions but not a Dean of Student Affairs Technology? This is a question that crosses my mind from time to time. According to Kevin Guidry’s research on the history of student affairs and technology, technology has been a part of student affairs for decades but I’m not sure as to why such a position has not existed before. [More…]

A Glimpse of Student Affairs in the (Near) Future?
There will come a point in the near future when these five forces — mobile, social media, data, sensors (internet of things) and location, as Robert Scoble and Shel Israel call them in their book “Age of Context” will transform student affairs. [More…]
The Need for a Common Higher Education Data Model

It seems to me that until a common structured data higher education data model that can be used as a standard exists, higher education institutions will not be able to develop holistic assessment of student success and to provide services such as advising that use curricular and co-curricular information. [More…]

Technologies, Assessment, and the Future of Student Affairs
The future of student affairs will include consumer technologies including mobile, data, sensors, social media, cloud, wearable computing, and location-based systems. This possibility is by no means a stretch if one is to consider what already exists outside the world of academia and follow consumer technology trends. [More…]

Pokemon Go Phenomenon

A game that can alter people’s behaviors and routines is certainly worth investigating. Pokemon Go, a new Augmented Reality (AR) and geolocation game on mobile devices is such a game. It’s amazing to watch  students and even staff at the university I work at glued to their mobile devices and congregate around poke stops throughout the campus trying to catch Pokemons. Through social media and from conversations with other friends and colleagues, it’s been interesting to observe the different reactions to the game, both positive and  negative,  and the issues that have been raised about the game itself. Here are just some of the observations:

- The game has brought opportunities for some to interact with others they would normally not have any interactions with. A colleague of mine shared a text from his son describing how through the game, he has interacted with different people from different backgrounds throughout the city he lives in as he shared game strategies with those he met.

- Accessibility issues have been raised as a problem with the game. The premise of the game is for players to physically move to locations to collect Pokemons, battle at gyms, and  travel distances for eggs to hatch. Folks who are physically disabled are not able to participate causing these folks to be depressed and creating barriers for disabled players.

- The game also highlights some issues related to race and safety. This topic is poignant given the last few days wherein the country is facing issues related to race and violence. For Black folks playing the game, there is unfortunately the element of fear as they could be met with suspicions leading to lethal consequences.

- Many folks have also been observed driving while playing the game, which has introduced safety issue to both the driver and pedestrians as the driver of this car experienced.

- Privacy also became an issue as it was discovered that the game have full access to a player’s Google account.

- For some, the game has brought some benefits to mental and physical health. In addition, parents have also welcomed the game as it has provided their children incentives to go outside and get some exercise as well as the opportunity to spend time together as family.

- A few higher education institutions, such as Harvard and Maryland quickly adopted the game as part of their marketing and student engagement efforts. However, a concern raised by a student affairs professional about the use of the game for student engagement is that this creates equity issues for students who either do not have mobile devices or for those that do have mobile devices, the game does use cellular data, if not connected to wifi, which costs money.

As one who studies the adoption of new technologies in higher education, Pokemon Go may have just accelerated the acceptance of Augmented Reality given the mass appeal among the public and changed the AR landscape. Hololens by Microsoft and other Virtual Reality devices and software should benefit from the popularity of the game. The game also benefits other related markets including mobile device batteries (the game drains the battery significantly) and cellular data providers as well. I also see possibility of the use of heads up display (hud) devices like Google Glass and other wearable computing devices for this game instead of players having their heads down looking at their phone to catch Pokemons, which could lead to neck problems. That the game offers in-game purchases also benefit app stores like Apple. Finally, advertisers and businesses will find ways to use the game to market their services and/or attract potential customers to their locations.

Whether the popularity of Pokemon Go is short-lived or extends for a few months, the game has provided some welcomed entertainment and distraction from the stressful times we are in at this moment as a country.